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Recreating the Commons? NGOs in Bangladesh

Recreating the Commons? NGOs in Bangladesh

NGOs have existed as indigenous self-help organizations throughout history across the globe. However, in the later part of the 20th century they have demonstrated a level of creativity, growth, and success that was largely unexpected by most development experts. Many have been pleasantly surprised at the inventiveness and successes of NGOs and generally these organizations have received wide support from the society. Many NGOs are involved in disaster relief or charitable work but most are engaged in "capacity building" or supplying services that are complementary to public provisions of health, education, advocacy, financial services and employment generation. NGOs are seen as organizations that transform the social space into one that is more democratic, harnessing a voice for marginalized and excluded groups, and empowering those that are the weak and vulnerable in national politics, economics, and culture.

Political Culture in Bangladesh: Perspectives and Analyses

Political Culture in Bangladesh: Perspectives and Analyses

This book is the first among others to follow and gathers the thoughts of prominent thinkers about some key political dimension pertaining to Bangladesh about which there is need for serious contemplation and action. It contains ideas about the country’s political culture, challenges of democratisation, approaches to institution building, issues of leadership and legitimacy, and the continuing saga of conflict between the two mainpolitical rivals and possible solutions. Additional chapters address the political economy of formulating national budgets, sustainable development, effects of politics on domestic savings, external political relations, and how to deal with a minority community -- the Biharis -- left to the whims and indifference of national and international bodies to be integrated into Bangladesh society or be repatriated.

Development Issues of Bangladesh-III: Human Development and Quality of Life

Development Issues of Bangladesh-III: Human Development and Quality of Life

Development Issues of Bangladesh-III has been written with the theme: human development and quality of life in Bangladesh. The two concepts, central to the evolution of a civilized society, are approached from a variety of perspectives that include key global indexes and their role in Bangladesh, various economic, social, and human aspects of development, governance and identity issues, class factions and the potential for democratization, empowerment and rights - especially of women, the role of a gender development index to account for women and their contributions, rural financial markets, health care, fertility, literacy and education and the potential for e-learning, environmental issues, as well as political economy and finance.

Development Issues of Bangladesh-II

Development Issues of Bangladesh-II

The book contains articles from a variety of disciplines held together by a common thread: socio-economic development of Bangladesh.  The articles are grouped together by their disciples such as political science, social science, science and technology and economics.  The contributing authors engage in systematic discussions on country's political and constitutional issues, causes of poverty and underdevelopment, corruptions and governance.  A number of articles deal with the status and prospects of fisheries, water resources, informal and higher education, and steel and engineering technology, while others focus on monetary and banking policies, privatization and effects and implications of globalization.

Development Issues of Bangladesh

Development Issues of Bangladesh

This book is based on the articles presented in the one-day international Conference on the "Socioeconomic Development of Bangladesh", organized by BDI along with the expatriate Bangladeshi nationals living in Western Pennsylvania. The Conference was held on August 12, 1995 at the Graduate School of Public Health Auditorium of the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. This book is comprised of nineteen articles presented at the Conference, an introduction by the editors and a foreword by Professor Nurul Islam.

Democracy in Bangladesh: Selected Essays from the Harvard Conferences in 2008, 2009

Democracy in Bangladesh: Selected Essays from the Harvard Conferences in 2008, 2009

This volume is based on selected papers from two conferences on Bangladesh at Harvard University in 2008 and 2009.  It covers a variety of challenging topics, ranging from linkages between democracy and security to effects of a given electoral system on political stability, micro-national autonomy for sub-regional peace, terrorism and its counter-forces, to NGOs’ role in development and social change, intra-regional cooperation in conflict mitigation, and refugee related violence in South Asia. A common theme that runs through the eight chapters of this volume is the felt need for multidimensional interactions in the continuous search for a common ground on which negotiations could happen for the resolutions of issues, problems and conflicts at different socio-politico-economic levels. Presenters at the Harvard Conference on Bangladesh whose selected papers appear in this volume as edited chapters comprise academics, policy implementers, researchers and consultants. The commonality tying them together is their quest for understanding the complex process of democratization for sustainable, multifaceted political development of Bangladesh.

The Bangladesh Economy: Diagnoses and Prescriptions

The Bangladesh Economy: Diagnoses and Prescriptions

The articles in this book cover a gamut of important areas that concern economists and have the potential to shape economic thinking in Bangladesh. Among the important themes covered by the authors are: macroeconomic issues, trade reforms and their impact, trade and international migration, determinants of aggregate import demand, impact and influence of foreign aid on government decision-making, foreign aid and GDP growth, money supply and output prices, effects of political instability on domestic savings, population growth and its relationship to per capita income growth, the effects of microcredit in poverty alleviation, the contributions of small and medium industries despite their lack of access to formal bank credit, microfinance and sustainability of self-reliance, compensation reform for the government labor pool, and performance of the non-financial state-owned corporations.

Bangladesh Economy in the 21st Century: Selected Essay from the Harvard Conferences in 2008, 2009

Bangladesh Economy in the 21st Century: Selected Essay from the Harvard Conferences in 2008, 2009

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the economy of Bangladesh has surprised even the most astute observers and development agencies at home and abroad. In recent years, the economy has been resilient and impressive. In a pioneering book in the early 1970’s Faaland and Parkinson called Bangladesh a “test case for development.” Their point was that if Bangladesh could succeed, there was hope for other poor and less developed nations in the world. Forty years after this challenge, today Bangladesh presents a model of how with grit and perseverance, a nation can overcome great odds to emerge as a successful economy.

Education and National Development: Selected Essays from the Harvard Conferences in 2008, 2009

 Education and National Development: Selected Essays from the Harvard Conferences in 2008, 2009

The book begins with a broad overview of the current education scene—from primary to tertiary education—and the wide range of issues they confront. The need to cultivate a culture of research in the higher education institutions (HEIs) that is contextually important and relevant is emphasized next. Two specific aspects of women’s (and, girls’) education in Bangladesh suggest, in the next chapter, the importance of educating women. The high drop-out rates from secondary schools, especially for girls, is also examined, concluding that in addition to financial and cultural reasons, a key factor causing dropout is the lack of curricular relevance to the lives and activities of girls. The need to modernize science education and make it more meaningful as a subject; the role of madrassah education that has grown phenomenally; and how gender stereotypes about choosing college education and hence career options ought to be addressed to bring about greater equity for women in the labor market are also thoughtfully addressed. The final chapter of the book summarizes the panel discussion that took place in the education plenary in October 2009 and suggests various strategies that the education sector ought to adopt to meet the needs of a 21stcentury workforce

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